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 Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity

This synthesis focuses on estimates of biodiversity change as projected for the 21st century by models or
extrapolations based on experiments and observed trends. The term “biodiversity” is used in a broad
sense as it is defined in the Convention on Biological Diversity to mean the abundance and distributions
of and interactions between genotypes, species, communities, ecosystems and biomes. This synthesis
pays particular attention to the interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem services and to

 SPC/SPREP

The research agreement signed on 19th December 2005 by the Institute of Research for Development (IRD), the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse III) and Nantes University, the Pharmacochemical laboratories of Natural Substances and Pharmacophores Redox (UMR 1165) and the Centre of Maritime and Ocean Law (EA 1165, CDMO) led to the international research program “Coral Reef Initiatives for the Pacific” (CRISP).

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

Work is based around country visits by the network coordinator to support PILN teams to identify and take strategic action to manage their priority invasive species. The network is functioning by sharing awareness of successful activities being earned out by the teams, providing the mechanism for other teams to do the same, and actively encouraging them to do so.
Capacity building is linked to on-going invasive species projects and achieved through workshops and exchanges.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

 Tourism Resource Consultants

In June/July 2002 an eradication programme to remove Pacific rats from Maninita Island in the Vava'u group of the Kingdom of Tonga was initiated. The techniques used were similar to those
used in successful rat eradications in New Zealand, in that Pestoff 20R pellets and a network of bait stations were used.
Conditions on the island were not what was expected, the forest having been adversely affected by cyclone Waka and subsequent defoliation by caterpillars, resulting in an open forest canopy. Rats were found to be present on the island in high numbers and were breeding.

 National Museum of Natural History

Williamson and Sabath (1982) have demonstrated a significant relationship between modern population size and environment by examining atoll area and rainfall in the Marshall Islands. The present work seeks to extend that argument into prehistory by examining the relationship of ancient habitation sites and size of aroid pit agricultural systems to atoll land area and rainfall regime along the 1,500-3,500 mm precipitation gradient in the Marshall Islands.

 The Smithsonian Institution

At the time of the POBSP visit, cats (Felis domestica), dogs

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This paper attempts to present a “quick snapshot” of the status of biodiversity in the Pacific Islands and the prospects and challenges for the mainstreaming of its conservation and sustainable use by Pacific Island peoples during the 21st century

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

A Pacific information brief from the Pacific Invasives Partnership (a working group of the Roundtable for Nature Conservation in the Pacific Islands)

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This report is primarily directed to analyzing the legal aspects of ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change. It sketches the impacts of climate change in the Pacific Island countries, recognizing that climate change directly impacts ecosystems, which provide for the needs of people as well as for the maintenance of the natural environment.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

The Helping Islands Adapt workshop was held in Auckland, New Zealand between the 11th and 16th of April 2010 to support regional action against invasive species on islands, in order to preserve biodiversity and adapt to climate change. It arose from decisions under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) relating to invasive alien species and island biodiversity.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This study, commissioned by the UNEP/CMS Secretariat, aims to identify how climate change is likely to affect individual migratory species, and the degree of threat that they face.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

There are three species of rat in the Pacific, the Polynesian rat Rattus exulans (the smallest), the ship rat Rattus rattus and the Norwegian rat Rattus norvegicus (the largest). Rats are one of the most damaging pests in urban zones, and this document is a guide on how and why it is necessary to control in the region.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This review was undertaken to examine the invasive species management components within the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plans of twelve Pacific island countries (PICs): Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Marine invasive species are currently recognized as one of the major direct causes of biodiversity loss and changes in ecosystem provisioning and supporting services. This dataset documents the recent progress in addressing their growing threat to ocean biodiversity and ecosystems.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

A guide into the management actions that will need to be taken into account for public awareness of myna birds and control actions.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

A fact sheet on aquatic invasive species.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

Verbesina encelioides, a gray, golden crownbeard, is a sunflower-like herbaceous annual plant ranging in height from 0.3 to 1.7 m with showy yellow flowers. It is native to the southwestern United States, the Mexican Plateau, and other parts of tropical America. Its invasive characteristics include high seed production (as many as 300–350 seeds per flower and multiple flowers per plant), seed dormancy, ability to tolerate dry conditions, and possible allelopathic effects. Many other Pacific islands with similar habitats could be invaded by V. encelioides

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

In light of the many existing guidebooks already available to support CBA (cost benefit analysis), this document is intended only as an introductory guide with a focus on the practical application of CBA in the Pacific. It indicates key questions and issues to address but it does not explain the theoretical concepts underpinning CBA.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This book is of worldwide benefit to people, for assessment and management of biological invasion risks

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

This policy applies to SPREP’s own data as well as data held by SPREP on behalf of government agencies and partners within the Pacific.